Ulrich Arnheim, in the ghetto Theresienstadt and camps in Auschwitz and Gleiwitz

Metadata

Testimony of Ulrich Arnheim, which became a part of the “documentation campaign” in Prague. Arnheim was deported from the Theresienstadt Ghetto to Auschwitz-Birkenau in the fall of 1944. He describes his shock upon arrival in the camp. After a few days, he was allocated to a work transport, which was sent to Gleiwitz for forced labor. Arnheim described the harsh living conditions of the inmates, the evacuation of the camp in January 1945, and the death march which followed.

zoom_in
4

Document Text

  1. English
  2. German
insert_drive_file
Text from page1

Statement

Recorded with Arnheim Ulrich, born 02.02.1927, lived in Prague XI, Bořivojova 44 c/o Singer, nationality Dutch, profession student, was a prisoner in the Terezín, Auschwitz, Gleiwitz and Blechhammer concentration camps.

On 28.09.1944 we were loaded (1st transport) in Terezín and went with the strong opinion, that we were being sent to Germany to work. When we arrived in Bautzen we became much more unsure about the destination. In Görlitz already we were all agreed, that we were going to the more or less famous Birkenau Ghetto. The only other was out, was that we would end up in the Glatzer coal mines. The hope became weaker and weaker, and as we finally arrived in Gleiwitz was completely gone.

We arrived on a large, open train station tracks when suddenly the doors burst violently open and we heard only these words: Everybody out, luggage stays in the carriage. The first things that we saw was electrified barbed wire on both sides with electric lamps every 5 meters. Further away, we saw a chimney, that had a giant red flam coming out of it. It was – we would later discover – one of the five furnaces, that worked night and day. We were in the annihilation and concentration camp Auschwitz-Birkenau. We had to line up in fives alongside the train and were shown to a big, strong SS-Hauptsturmführer who sorted us. (Dr. Schwarz) The weak, ill, elderly and those younger than 14-16 years were led into the camp on the left. Those of us who were left (from the transport of 2500, 1100 were left) went to camp on the right.

Now that we had arrived in the camp, the SS told us that this camp is the Auschwitz camp, that people who don’t want to work are gassed here, but that was nothing to do with us is we were willing to work, and that we would get new clothes. We were led into the sauna, undressed completely, shaved, bathed and got new clothes. The clothes were the German prison uniform. Then we were led into the actual camp. This was divided into two barracks and the camp senior – a German felon – explained the rules of the camp to us.

When this was finished, we were chased out of the block in order to spend the long, beautiful day outside. At 1PM we got our first meal. It was ¾ of a litre of pumpkin soup that was inedible for a cultivated person. But we were starving and when a person is hungry, he will eat everything. This amazing lunch was given to us in dirty bowls, or if you were especially lucky, in washing bowls. Altogether, there was about 30 bowls available for 1000 people. The meal had to be finished with 30 minutes. Spoons, or other such items used by people daily, were a rarity for us and none of us thought about them anymore. And so, we spent the whole day outside, in front of the barrack, until at about 7PM when there was dinner. This consisted of 150g of bread, a spoonful of marmalade and a slice of sausage that could only be seen through a magnifying glass. After this extensive evening meal, we were chases into the barracks in order to sleep. However, what one usually understands as sleep and lying down of course didn’t apply here. Five of us sat on a freezing cold, concrete floor and fought over space until one or another fell asleep more or less tired.

At 4AM we were forced out of these wonderful four-poster beds and the terrible, new and oh so long day would begin. Three times a day we had roll call so that nobody could escape and tell the world how nice, wonderful and cultivated life was under the liberators of Europe. It went on

insert_drive_file
Text from page2
like this for six days, until we were finally allocated to a work transport. Of course, nobody knew where it was going, the main thing was getting out of this inferno of death and the Devil.

After we got new clothes and were bathed clean, we were brought to a train station – envied by those who had to stay behind – to be sent to our new camp. We travelled for a few hours until we arrived at our destination at about 11PM. It turned out that we were in Gleiwitz. We were led to a camp, given our first good soup and sent to bed. At 4AM we were awoken and presented for roll call. We heard now officially that we were in the work camp Gleiwitz I, which belonged to the RAW (Reich Railway Improvement Works). We wanted to work that factory. The SS Camp Commandant Moll explained to us that we would have it good – good food, work, treatment – as long as we were prepared to work. We shouldn’t be bothered by the wall and the electric fence. The very next day we went to work in the factory.

The food really was a bit better than in Birkenau. In the morning we got 150g of bread, 20g of margarine; midday we got ¼ litre of soup from beets and water, apart from Sundays when we had potato soup; and evenings again 150g of bread and 50g of salami. But the work was for many people strenuous. It was also very dirty work, and on top of all that there was the harassment from the master (German), for whom we were just cattle. Add to that the very little sleep that we got at night and the long hours we worked with only half an hour lunch break. A normal person who doesn’t have the strength of horse can’t endure it. After we got back to the camp from work, we were tormented by the SS, Capos and block seniors until 9PM. And so we lived from one day to the next, every second Sunday should be free from 2PM. For us it looked like we had to carry stones from the outside the whole morning long. Even the people running the camp didn’t know why. It was just harassment. Thank God that time passed and it was soon Christmas. Eight days before we were told that if we behave ourselves and there were no complaints from the factory about laziness amongst the prisoners, then at Christmas we would get two full days off. We would also get better food.

Christmas came and we really did get the first day off. There was also a thick potato soup and cooked potatoes. The second day didn’t go quite so peacefully. We were lying in bed as the camp senior came in and all hell broke loose. The place looked like a pigsty. Ten minutes later roll call was announced and as punishment, carrying stones was ordered. We carried stones until 3PM and then we stood at roll call until 5PM, during which the dirtiest were sought out and punished with a beating. At 5.30PM, we finally got our lunch and then immediately afterwards our evening meal and were allowed to go to bed completely exhausted and battered. That’s what the two free days at Christmas looked like for us. But, we were already used to such things. What can you expect of such beastly creatures as the Germans were? It was almost New Year. The German camp management wanted again to appear human and let us have the day off. I think it probably better to say that they wanted to the day off and to do that of course they had to give us the day off. The new year began. What troubles would it bring for us? Nobody knew. But look, it began well. Our camp commandant Moll, formerly the head of the annihilation chambers in Auschwitz, was transferred to Buna-Monowitz, and we got a new one. The first impression was promising. He held a speech in which – amongst other things – he pronounced that under him, there was no work on Sundays, that the food would be improved and that better care would be provided for the many people who were ill. We breathed a little easier. In any case, he was not like Moll, and pretended at least that he had good intentions. How well he would deliver them, that remained to be seen.

insert_drive_file
Text from page3

And the next Sunday we really did get off. And once there was milk. But none of it lasted very long. On the 18th of January, the shift coming back from the factory told those of us who were ill in bed, that the factory was being dismantled because of the advance of the Russians. This hit us like a bomb. And the question quickly arose of what would be done with us. There were three possibilities: 1 shoot us, 2 leave us to the Russians, 3 evacuation to the not yet occupied Germany. There was much commotion in the camp. Nobody new what was going to happen in the next hours. Suddenly, at 4PM, we were given our evening meal and sent to bed. We were expecting an unexpectedly quick decampment. And then, at midnight we were woken up and told to get ready and at 6AM we started out. Even the SS guards didn’t know where we were going. We had about 1.5 kg of bread and 1/2 kg of margarine that was supposed to be our food for three days. We started marching. We didn’t have the slightest ideas how long we would be marching for. After we had walked six hours through snow and ice without rest, we were told that we still had 37 km to go until we would get our first break. We were all Muselmänner [walking skeletons] and knew that even if any of us were even capable of doing it, we would have to march into the night.

Every so often, someone would collapse and then the SS wouldshoot them. And so we went, on and on to Germany. And then suddenly, at about 1AM, there appeared a camp before us. We were forced into the camp and more than 1000 men were thrust into not very large barracks. It wasn’t possible to properly lie down, and barely possible to stand. People were sitting on each other. It was terrible. In one camp, (Jakobswalde), we stayed until 11AM the next day only to begin marching again. We started marching, destination unknown. But we noticed that something wasn’t right. Things were going badly behind the front. We marched at a brisk pace and without a break for twelve hours and arrived at Blechhammer at 11PM. We were met by Jewish Capos and block seniors.They were very friendly to us and said that we would continue tomorrow. We slept for the first time in four days in beds. At 4AM we were drummed out of bed for roll call and departure. We however – a few hundred who were in one of the barracks at the back – had decided, that we wouldn’t go until the SS came and collected us themselves. And we did the right thing. 700 men had followed the SS and were now leaving with them. Because the SS were in a rush and you could already here the drone of the front, the SS were satisfied with the 700 volunteers and left the rest of us to our punishment from the Russians. It wasn’t a long period of peace. The next night, an SS detachment came and took a further 400 men who had gone to the gate out of curiosity. In the camp, the prisoners were starving which led to the savage killings amongst themselves. The bread and provision stores were attacked and anybody who left carrying bread was beaten and bludgeoned until unconscious or half dead by those standing outside. Death came when those who emerged afterwards stood on the those who had been beaten and defended what they had. In the meantime, an SS annihilation troop had shown up and divided themselves amongst the watchtowers, using the people running around blow as target practice. When they were finished and they were afraid as the front got nearer and nearer, they attempted to set the camp on fire, which for all but two of the barracks they failed to do. Finally, they made themselves scarce. The camp was a terrible sight. Every couple of meters there was a dead body, half burnt or bled-out and congealed in the cold.

The bodies caused a terrible smell of plague. We lived like that for 2-3 days in the most awful fear that we would be shot at the last minute by the Germans. Even when there was no more SS in the camp,

insert_drive_file
Text from page4
we were still in the German area of the front, and Russians weren’t coming as quickly as we hoped. On the fifth day, a brave man who had ventured outside of the camp met a Russian tank. The rejoicing was immense, because none of us had thought that we would ever get out of the clutches of the German beasts.

Signature: Ulrich Arnheim

Protocol received by:

Berta Gerzonová

Signatures of witnesses:

Dita Saxlová, Helena Schicková

Received on behalf of the Documentation campaign by:

2. X. 1945

Received on behalf of the archive by:

Alex Schmiedt

Scheck

insert_drive_file
Text from page1

Protokoll

Aufgenommen mit Arnheim Ulrich, geb. am 2.2.1927, wohnhaft in Prag XI., Bořivojova 44 c/o Singer, Nationalität Holländisch, Beruf Student, gewesener Häftling der Konzentrationslager Terezín, Auschwitz, Gleiwitz und Blechhammer.

Am 28.9.1944 wurden wir (1. Transport) in Terezín verladen, und fuhren mit der festen Meinung, es ginge nach Deutschland zur Arbeit, fort. In Bautzen angekommen, wurden wir betreffs des Zieles unsicher. In Görlitz bereits waren wir uns einig, dass es wahrscheinlich nach dem mehr oder weniger bekannten Ghetto Birkenau ginge. Es blieb uns dennoch der Ausweg, dass wir in die Glatzer Kohlenbergwerke kämen. Die Aussicht wurde jedoch immer schwächer, und als wir endlich in Gleiwitz ankamen, ganz zunichte.

Wir langten auf einem großen freien und offenen Bahnhofsgeleise an, als plötzlich die Türe gewaltig aufgestoßen wurde und wir nur die Worte: Alles heraus, Gepäck bleibt im Wagen, hörten. Das erste, was wir sahen, war zu beiden Seiten Stacheldraht, der elektrisch geladen war und alle 5 Meter eine elektrische Laterne. Von weitem sehen wir einen Schornstein, aus dem eine riesige rote Flamme emporstieg. Es war, wie wir später erfuhren, eine der 5 Kamine, die Tag und Nacht arbeiteten. Wir waren im K.Z.-Vernichtungslager Auschwitz-Birkenau. Wir mussten zu 5 längs des Zuges antreten und wurden einzeln einem starken, großen SS-Hauptsturmführer vorgeführt, der uns aussondierte. (Dr. Schwarz) Die Schwachen, Kranken, Ueberalteten und unter 14 – 16 Jahren wurden in das linke Lager geführt. Wir Übrigen (Vom Transport 2.500 blieben 1100) kamen ins rechte Lager.

Jetzt, im Lager angekommen, wurde uns von der SS mitgeteilt, dass dieses Lager das Lager Auschwitz sei, dass hier Menschen, die nicht arbeiten wollen, vergast werden, was uns aber, wenn wir arbeitswillig wären, ja nicht weiter anginge und dass wir neue Kleider bekämen. Wir wurden in die Sauna geführt, vollständig ausgezogen, geschoren, gebadet und erhielten neue Kleidung. Diese Kleidung war die deutsche Sträflingsuniform. Jetzt führte man uns in das eigentliche Lager. Hier wurden wir in 2 Baracken aufgeteilt und der Lagerälteste, ein deutscher Schwerverbrecher, machte uns mit der Lagerordnung bekannt. Nachdem dies erledigt war, wurden wir aus dem Block gejagt, um im Freien den schönen langen Tag zu verbringen. Um 13h erhielten wir das erste Essen. Es bestand aus einem 3/4 Liter Kürbissuppe, die für einen kultivierten Menschen ungeniessbar war. Aber wir hatten grossen Hunger und wenn der Mensch Hunger hat, isst er alles. Das grossartige Mittagessen wurde uns in verdrecken Schüsseln, oder, wer besonderes Glück hatte, in Waschschüsseln verabreicht. Im ganzen waren ca. 30 Schalen für 1.000 Personen vorhanden. Binnen einer halben Stunde musste das Essen erledigt sein. Löffel, oder sonstige Gegenstände, die der Mensch im täglichen Gebraucht benutzt, waren für uns Raritäten, an die keiner mehr dachte. So verbrachten wir den ganzen Tag vor der Baracke im Freien, bis es ca. um 7h Nachtmahl gab. Dieses bestand aus 15 dkg Brot, einem Löffel Marmelade und einem Scheibchen Wurst, dass aber nur unter der Lupe gesehen werden konnte. Nach diesem reichhaltigen Nachtmahl jagte man uns in die Baracken, um dort zu schlafen. Aber was man im Allgemeinen unter schlafen und liegen versteht, konnte man bei uns natürlich nicht anwenden. Wir sassen zu fünfen, einer in dem anderen auf einem eiskalten Betonfussboden und stritten uns um die Plätze, bis der eine, oder andere mehr oder weniger müde, einschlief. Um 4 h morgens holte man uns aus unseren wunderbaren Himmelbetten und der neue, schreckliche und auh, so lage Tag begann [sic]. Wir hatten 3 x täglich Apell, damit ja keiner flieht und der Welt erzählen könnte, wie schön, wunderbar und kultiviert wir unter den Befreiern Europas lebten. So ging

insert_drive_file
Text from page2
das 6 Tage, bis wir endlich in einen Arbeitertransport eingereiht wurden. Wohin es ging, das wusste natürlich keiner, aber die Hauptsache war, hinaus aus dieser Hölle des Teufels und des Todes.

Nachdem wir neue Kleider erhielten und sauber gebadet wurden, kamen wir auf den Bahnhof, beneidet von den Zurückbleibenden, um nach unserem neuen Lager versandt zu werden. Wir fuhren ein paar Stunden, als wir um 11 h nachts am Bestimmungsort ankamen. Es stellte sich heraus, dass wir in Gleiwitz waren. Man führte uns in ein Lager, verabreichte uns die erste gute Suppe, und schickte uns schlafen. Um 4 h morgens wurden wir geweckt und traten zu Apell an. Jetzt erfuhren wir offiziell, dass wir im Arbeitslager Gleiwitz I waren, welches zum RAW (Reichsbahnausbesserungswerk) gehörte. Wir wollten in jener Fabrik arbeiten. Der SS-Lagerführer Moll erklärte uns, dass wir es sehr gut haben würden, gutes Essen, Arbeit, Behandlung, vorausgesetzt, dass wir arbeitswillig waren. Die Mauer und der elektrische Draht brauche uns garnicht zu genieren. Gleich am nächsten Tag gingen wir zur Arbeit in Werk. Das Essen war wirklich etwas besser wie in Birkenau. Morgen 15dkg Brot 2dkg Margarine, Mittags 1/4L Suppe aus Rüben und Wasser, bis auf Sonntag, wo es Kartoffelsuppen gab und abends wieder 15dkg Brot und 5dkg Salami. Doch die Arbeit im Werk war für viele zu schwer. Ausserdem aber, war es sehr dreckige Arbeit und zu allem kam noch die Schikane der Meister (deutscher), für die wir eben nur Vieh waren. Dazu kam sehr wenig Schlaf in der Nacht, die zu lange Arbeitszeit, mit nur einer halben Stunde Mittagspause. Das kann ein normaler Mensch, wenn er nicht Kräfte wie ein Pferd hat, nicht aushalten. Nach der Arbeit ins Lager angekommen, wurden wir von der SS, Capos und Blockältesten bis 9 h weiter gepeinigt. So lebten wir von einem Tag auf den anderen, sonntags sollte alle 14 Tage frei sein. Für uns sah das so aus, dass wir von auswärts den ganzen Vormittag Steine schleppen mussten. Wozu, das wusste nicht einmal die Lagerleitung. Es war einfach Schikane. Doch, Gott sei Dank, die Zeit verging und es war bald Weihnachten. 8 Tage vorher teilte man uns mit, dass, wenn wir uns ordentlich betragen werden und wenn aus der Fabrik keine Klagen wegen Faulheit der Häftlinge kämen, wir auf Weihnachten 2 Tage vollständig frei haben werden. Auch besseres Essen sollten wir bekommen. Weihnachten kam und wir hatten den ersten Tag wirklich frei. Auch gab es dicke Kartoffelsuppe und Pellkartoffeln. Der zweite Tag jedoch verlief nicht so ruhig. Wir lagen gerade auf den Betten, als der Lagerälteste hereinkam und schon ein Gewitter über uns losging. Es wäre bei uns ein Saustall. 10 Minuten später wurde Apell gerufen und es wurde strafweise Steineschleppen angeordnet. Bis 3 h schleppten wir Steine, nachher standen wir bis 5 h Apell, während unter uns die schmutzigen ausgesucht und mit Schlägen bestraft wurden. Um 1/2 6 h bekamen wir endlich unser Mitagessen, gleich darauf Nachtmahl und durften vollständig müde und zerschlagen unsere Betten aufsuchen. So sahen bei uns die 2 freien Weihnachtstage aus. Aber, wir waren schon an so manches gewöhnt. Was kann man von so bestialischen Wesen wie es die Deutschen waren schon verlangen? Es nahte Neujahr. Die deutsche Lagerleitung wollte sich wieder menschlich zeigen und gab uns frei. Ich glaube, es klingt besser wenn sagt, sie wollten selber frei haben. Um das zu erreichen, mussten sie natürlich zuerst uns freigeben. Das neue Jahr begann. Welche Unannehmlichkeiten wird es uns bringen? Keiner wusste es. Doch siehe. Es beginnt gut. Unser Lagerleiter Moll, ehemals Leiter der Vernichtungskammer in Auschwitz wird versetzt nach Buna-Monowitz, während wir einen neuen erhalten. Der erste Eindruck in [sic] vielversprechend. Er hält eine Rede, in welcher er unter Anderem erklärt, dass bei ihm Sonntag nicht gearbeitet wird, dass das Essen aufgebessert wird und dass er auch für die vielen Kranken besser sorgen wird. Man atmete etwas erleichtert auf. Er war für alle Fälle nicht so wie Moll, tat wenigstens so, als ob er gute Vorsätze hätte. Wie weit er sie erfüllen kann, das wird sich zeigen.

insert_drive_file
Text from page3

Und wirklich, am nächsten Sonntag war arbeitsfrei. Auch gab es einmal Milch. Doch all das dauerte nicht lange. Am 18 Jänner kam plötzlich die Schicht aus dem Werk und erzählte uns, dass wir im K.B. kranklagen, dass das Werk wegen Vormarsches der Russen abmontiert werden würde. Das traf uns wie eine Bombe. Jetzt kam die Frage auf, was man mit uns machen wird. Es gab 3 Möglichkeiten: 1./ Erschiessen, 2./ den Russen überlassen, 3./ Evakuation in das damals noch unbesetzte Deutschland. Im Lager herrschte große Aufregung. Kiener wusste, was in den nächsten Stunden geschieht. Doch da gab man uns plötzlich um 4 h Nachmittag Nachtmahl und schickte uns schlafen. Also, man rechnete mit unerwartet schnellem Abmarsch. Und wirklich, um 12 h nachts wurden wir geweckt, mussten uns fertig machen und um 6 h morgens ging es los. Wohin, das wusste nicht einmal die SS-Postenkette. Wir hatten 1 1/2 kg Brot gefasst und 1/2 kg Margarine, das sollte das ganze Essen für 3 Tage sein. Wir marschierten los. Ohne die geringste Ahnung zu haben, wie lange wir marschieren würden. Nachdem wir 6 Stunden durch Eis und Schnee ohne Rast gingen erfuhren wir, dass wir noch 37 km zurücklegen müssen, bis die erste Pause sein wird. Wir waren alle Muselmänner und wussten, dass – wenn es von uns überhaupt jemand schafft – wir noch bis in die Nacht zu marschieren haben. Alle Momente brach jemand zusammen, der dann von der SS erschossen wurde. So ging es langsam, nach und nach nach Deutschland hinein. Doch plötzlich, es war um 1 h nachts, tauchte vor uns ein Lager auf. Man trieb uns in das Lager und mehr als 1000 Mann wurden in eine nicht zu grosse Baracke gesteckt. Dort konnte man nicht richtig liegen, ja kaum stehen. Einer sass auf dem anderen. Es war schrecklich. In einem Lager (Jakobswalde) blieben wir bis zum nächsten Vormittag um 11 h, um dann weiter zu marschieren. Mir marschierten ab, Ziel unbekannt. Doch wir merkten, dass irgendetwas nicht stimmte. Vor allen Dingen ging es hinten der Front zu. Wir marschierten in scharfen Tempo ohne Pause 12 Stunden und kamen und 11 h nachts in Blechhammer an. Dort wurden wir von jüdischen Capos und Blockältesten empfangen. Sie waren zu uns sehr freundlich und sagten, dass es morgens weiterginge. Wir schliefen jetzt seit 4 Tagen die erste Nacht wieder in Betten. Morgens um 4 h trommelte man uns wirklich zum Apell und Abmarsch. Wir jedoch – ein paar hundert, die in den hinteren Baracken lagen – waren entschlossen, nicht eher anzutreten, bis uns die SS nicht selbst holen kommt. Und wirklich, wir hatten gut getan. 700 Mann hatten der SS gefolgt und zogen nun mit ihr los. Weil es die SS ziemlich eilig hatte und man schon Dröhnen von der Front hörte, begnügte sich die SS mit den 700 freiwillig Angetretenen und überliess uns zur Bestrafung den Russen. Es war jedoch noch lange keine Ruhe. In der folgenden Nacht kam ein SS-Trupp und nahm weitere 400, die neugierig an das Tor gegangen waren, mit. Im Lager, unter den gewesenen Häftlingen, war grosser Hunger, der zu grausamen Totschlägen unter den Häftlingen selbst führte. Man stürmte die Brot- und Proviantkammer und wer mit Broten beladen herauskam, wurde von den Draussenstehenden mit solchen Schlägen und Keulenhieben empfangen, dass er bewusstlos oder halbtot liegen blieb. Den Rest gaben ihm die später herauskommenden, die auf den Niedergeschlagenen standen und ihre Habe verteidigten. Inzwischen war ein SS-Vernichtungstrupp erschienen, der sich auf den Wachttürmen verteilte und die herumlaufenden Menschen als Zielscheibe benützte. Als sie damit fertig waren und die immer näherrückende Front ihnen Angst und Bange machte, versuchten sie noch das Lager anzuzünden, was ihnen bis auf 2 Baracken nicht gelang und endlich machten sie sich aus dem Staub. Der Anblick im Lager war schrecklich. Alle paar Meter ein Toter, hab verkohlt oder verblutet und in der Kälte erstarrt. Es war grausam. Die Leichen verbreiteten einen furchtbaren Pestgerucht. So lebten wir 2-3 Tage in schrecklicher Angst, der Deutsche könnte uns noch im letzten Moment abschiessen. Wenn auch im Lager

insert_drive_file
Text from page4
selbst mehr keine SS war, so waren wir immer noch im deutschen Frontgebiet und der Russe liess auf sich warten. Am 5. Tage endlich entdeckte ein Mutiger, der sich aus dem Lager herausgetraut hatte, einen russischen Tank. Der Jubel war riesengross, denn keiner von uns hatte daran gedacht überhaupt noch einmal aus den Händen der deutschen Bestie zu entkommen.

Podpis:

Ulrich Arnheim

Protokol přijala:

Berta Gerzonová

Podpis svědků:

Dita Saxlová, Helena Schicková

Za Dokumentační akci přijal:

2. X. 1945

Za archiv přijal:

Alex Schmiedt

Scheck

References

  • Updated 2 years ago
The Czech lands (Bohemia, Moravia and Czech Silesia) were part of the Habsburg monarchy until the First World War, and of the Czechoslovak Republic between 1918 and 1938. Following the Munich Agreement in September 1938, the territories along the German and Austrian frontier were annexed by Germany (and a small part of Silesia by Poland). Most of these areas were reorganized as the Reichsgau Sudetenland, while areas in the West and South were attached to neighboring German Gaue. After these terr...
This collection originated as a documentation of the persecution and genocide of Jews in the Czech lands excluding the archival materials relating to the history of the Terezín ghetto, which forms a separate collection. The content of the collection comprises originals, copies and transcripts of official documents and personal estates, as well as prints, newspaper clippings, maps, memoirs and a small amount of non-written material. The Documents of Persecution collection is a source of informati...