Bernat Landau, experiences at camps in Hungary, Poland and Germany

Metadata

Questionnaire filled out by Bernat Landau (a child born in Kisvarda, Hungary, in 1928) in the Wolfratshausen DP camp.

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Document Text

  1. English
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Unaccompanied child

Registration No.

G 11367511 copy 1(✓) 2 3 M(x) F MARITAL STATUS Sing. (x) Mar. Wid. Div.

SUPPLEMENTARY RECORD – FACE SHEET

CHILD

Evidence of Verification

Date

Family or Surname

LANDAU

Given or Christian Names

Bernat (Bernard)

Other Names Used

Birthdate Day Month Year. As Verified: Day Month Year

10 Oct. 1928

Birthplace Town Province Country

Birthplace As Verified: Town Province Country

Kisvarda Sabolc Hungary

Nationality Claimed Nationality Verified

Hungarian Jew

Address in Country of Origin Prior to Displacement

Kisvarda, Deag Perenc 15.

Date of Displacement

April 1944

Present location of Child including Name of Family, Center or institution, Person in Charge, Address, Date arrived at this location.

D.P. Camp Wolfratshausen, Team 106. Dir. Cohen. Germany July 1945

Language usually spoken

Hungarian, Hebrew, Yiddish, German

Other languages used

Religion

Jewish

Occupation

Bookprinter

FATHER

FAMILY

Family Name

LANDAU

First

Lipold

Middle

Birthdate

1904

Nationality

Hungarian Jew

Last known address

Sentendre, Hungary, Labor camp.

Date last heard from

1942

Permanent address

Kisvarda, Deag Ferenc 15.

Occupation

bookbinder

Place of Employment

Had a printing and bookbinding shop.

MOTHER

Maiden Name

GODINGER

Family Name

LANDAU

First

Rosa

Middle

Birthdate

1906

Nationality

Hungarian Jew

Last known address

Auschwitz. Probably died there in 1944, April.

Date last heard from

Permanent address

Kisvarda, Deag Ferenc 15.

Occupation

Place of Employment

Other members of the immediate family and relatives. List for each the Name, Age, Relationship, Last known address, Former permanent address, Occupation and Employment, if known. (Continue on reverse side of page as necessary.)

Lenke, 22, sister. Now in Hungary. Comes here in next days.

Herman, 20, brother. At present in same camp.

Etel, 19, sister. At present in same camp.

Father's brother: Eugen WEINSTOCK, 108 Lewis st., New York City.

Uncle is trying to get affidavit for all 4 children.

Contact made.

Face Sheet prepared by: Harry Liebster

Team: 567

Date: 4 April 1946.

Information obtained from:

Landau, Bernat

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First displacement:

April 1944 – left home with mother and brother and sisters.

Chronological record.

April 1944 left home with mother, brother and sisters. Went to Auschwitz Concentration camp. Father was taken to Hungarian Labor Camp in 1942. Mother was separated from children. He and brother went to Dachau after 3 weeks.

Sisters went to Leipzig.

Then boys to Allach; liberated there May 1, 1945.

Then went to Feldafing Camp with brother.

Sisters came to Feldafing, arrived in Wolfratshausen.

July 1945.

Lenke went home to look for parents.

Will come back. According to last letter she did not find anybody there.

Relatives

UncleEugen Weinstock in New York City will send affidavit through Washington. Contact made.

Language

Boy speaks Hungarian, German, Yiddish, Hebrew.

Documents

Certificate from Concentration Camp Dachau, dated 9 Jan. 1946.

School record

8 year primary school (Hungarian-Jewish).

Besides that learned bookprinting in father's shop.

History of family.

Father had a bookpringing shop in Kisvarda; besides that a clothing-store. Mother worked at home.

Boy wants to go to the U.S. as soon as possible with his sisters and brother.

Seems to be an intelligent boy, good-looking, well-bred.

References

  • Updated 1 year ago
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The questionnaires include questions concerning the names of family members, their places of origin and the general background of the children. On the reverse side of each questionnaire there is a short report regarding the history of the child from the day s/he was deported to the ghetto, the camps to which s/he was deported, when s/he was separated from his/her family members and places where s/he was from after the liberation until his/her arrival at the DP camp.