Alexander Schmiedt, the experiences from Kaufering and Dachau

Metadata

Testimony of Alexander (Shlomo) Schmiedt, which became a part of the “documentation campaign” in Prague. Schmiedt was deported from Prague to the Theresienstadt Ghetto in July 1942, from where he was sent to Auschwitz in the fall of 1944. He was liberated in the Kaufering concentration camp. After the war, Schmiedt became one of the main co-workers of the “documentation campaign” in Prague and later emigrated to Israel.

zoom_in
3

Document Text

  1. English
  2. Czech
insert_drive_file
Text from page1

In Prague, 24. VIII. 1921

Statement

Alex. Schmiedt, born 27. I. 1921, former prisoner of the conc. camps Kaufering III, Türkheim, and Dachau. Praha II., Biskupská 5, Jewish nationality, profession clerk.

From July 1942 to the end of September 1944 I was in Theresienstadt. I went on the first of the labor transports to Auschwitz, where I spent 5 days. On October 5th, we were stuffed into cattle cars and went through Olomouc, Vienna, and Salzburg to Kaufering. The journey took 3 days and we had a 1½ kg loaf of bread, 10 dkg of margarine and 10 dkg of salami. But we were happy to be leaving terrible Auschwitz behind. At the Kaufering train station, our transport (about 1,500 men from Theresienstadt) was divided and I arrived together with about 500 men to 3rd camp. The first 2-3 weeks it was bearable. There wasn’t a lot of food, but we still had a certain amount of bodily strength, and therefore we weren’t that starving. But with the increasingly cold weather the food rations got smaller and smaller and in November our first friend, Meir Lindenbaum, died. After that, the chain of illnesses, misery, and death was never broken. The camp contained about 1,800 men, mostly Hungarian Jews, and you were basically lost if you couldn’t speak Hungarian. We lived in the so-called Erdbunker – long, underground buildings with a single window, two rows of boards for sleeping, and a stove and a chimney in the middle. Every prisoner had a blanket, a bowl, and a spoon. I worked in the so-called Holzman commando digging in the forest. After several weeks of work, most of my friends had feet covered in sores and frostbite, and could barely drag themselves to their workplace. This was the construction of an enormous munitions plant, in fact of a whole town hidden in the woods. The forest was about 2 km away from our camp. In the first few months, one had to work even if one had open, festering sores and a high fever. Every day they would bring back from the commandos the bodies of friends who had died while working. Later, the sick people’s situation improved slightly, but the food got worse. In the beginning, we were given about 37 dkg of bread per day, Zulags (2 dkg of margarine, or a slice of salami, a piece of cheese, a pinch of butter, a spoonful of marmalade or synthetic honey), and a liter of watery soup in the evening. Workers were also given about 20 dkg of bread with margarine and warm water (soup) at noon at the place where we worked. In the end, the extra food for workers was cut and the portion of bread fluctuated between 15-25 dkg per day. The workday went like this: alarm at 4:45 in the morning, roll call at 5:30 in the morning, 7:00 leave for work, at 6:00 in the evening return from the commando, roll call, get in line in front of the kitchen. Lights were turned off in the bunkers at 9:00 at night. This was the schedule and the food was a regular häftling. The camp’s block staff, medical staff, and others had significant privileges in terms of the food they were given, as well as at their work, lodgings, and the clothes they received. The Lägerältester, his representative, and the leading capos were aryans. They were housed separately and the kitchens prepared food especially for them. Like everywhere else, people were afraid of infectious diseases,

insert_drive_file
Text from page2
especially spotted typhus. The gravely ill were transported to the Krankenlager. All of us knew that there was very little hope of returning from there. Most of the sick were from the Moll commando, where working conditions were unbearable. After a commute of 1½ hours, we worked for 12 hours with a half-hour break and then once again the 1½ hour long commute back home. Work was hard (carrying bags of cement, laying cement, etc.) and the only food we received was a bowl of cold tea made from grass. The strongest of us didn’t last longer than 3 weeks. Many of our best people, mainly from the 1st camp, lost their lives there. Out of the 1,500 men who came to the Kaufering camps, in my opinion, 40-50 returned. On March 8th, a transport left from the 3rd camp to Türkheim (5th camp) 1Note 1: Kaufering - Lager V was Utting, Lager VI was Türkheim. I was also slated to be transported and I was happy because I told myself that nowhere could be worse than Kaufering. For the first few days I regretted it because we were so hungry, but the conditions soon improved and during the last weeks we received peeled potatoes every day – the most ideal camp food, not only because it filled one up better than soup, but it contained on the side potato peels, whole bowls of which, with a bit of luck and impertinence, could sometimes be collected from the capitalists. I worked during the the first three weeks in Türkheim – unlike in other camps, we were guarded only by Death’s Headers, and, when we were lucky, Czechs, of whom there were many. Then I became so weak and exhausted that the doctor pronounced me a sick person and sent me to the krankenblock. An epidemic of spotted typhus broke out in the camp at the end of March. The number of those infected rose every day at an alarming rate and in the end the doctors stopped doing check-ups and marched whoever had a fever of over 38 degrees straight to the typhus ward. I was suffering from horrible diarrhea, and since I also had a fever, I, too, was placed among the typhus sufferers. Protests and screams didn’t help. I couldn’t escape from typhus in any case. There was nothing one could do about the everpresent lice. I lay for 10 days with a high fever and began to get better right when the order to evacuate the camp was issued. Whoever could walk went on foot; we, the sick, were driven by car to Landsberg (1st camp). I spent two horrible days there in indescribable squalor and with barely any food (at the time I weighed about 45 kg, my height being 187 cm). Finally, this camp, too, was evacuated, and although I could barely stand, I walked, or rather crawled, to the train station near Holzmann, which was situated about 3 kilometers away. There, they packed us onto cattle cars, and with the last of my strength I managed to get a spot in a covered car because I was afraid of the rain of and air strikes. My fears were justified. We traveled a distance of 30 km from Landsberg to Dachau for two days and two nights. On the last day and night it rained hard and constantly. We also experienced several serious air strikesAmerican pilots probably thought we were a military transport. Many ran away; I was too weak and didn’t move from the car even when the shooting was at its peak. About 3,000 of us left Landsberg and only about 1,000 of us made it to Dachau alive. About 200 ran away during the journey. These figures are not exact and are just my own estimate. In Dachau, we
insert_drive_file
Text from page3
went through the disinfection process during the night of April 28th, and then I slept like the dead for 15 hours. I slept through the constant shelling of the town all through the night and even when the fight reached the camp the following morning. Prisoners participated in the fighting, and by the afternoon the U.S. flag flew over the main guard tower. Our liberators arrived not a moment too soon, for we later learned that Himmler had issued a special order to shoot all of the Dachau prisoners on the evening of April 29th.

Alex. Schmiedt

Signature of witnesses:

Marta Kratková

Robert Weinberger

Documentation campaign: Zeev Scheck

21. VIII. 1945

On behalf of the archive: Alex Schmiedt

insert_drive_file
Text from page1

Praze, 24. VIII. 1945

Protokol

Alex. Schmiedt, nar. 27. I. 1921, bývalý vězeň konc. táborů Kaufering III, Türkheim a Dachau. Praha II., Biskupská 5, nár. žid., povol. úředník.

Od července 1942 do konce září 1944 jsem byl v Terezíně. Jel jsem prvním z pracovních transportů do Osvěčimi, kde jsem byl 5 dní. 5. října jsme byli vtěsnáni do dobytčáků a jeli jsme přes Olomouc, Vídeň, a Salcburk do Kauferingu. Na cestu, která trvala 3 dny, jsme měli 1 ½ kg-ový bochník chleba, 10 dkg margarinu a 10 dkg salámu. Byli jsme však šťastni, že necháváme hrozný Osvěčím za sebou. Na kauferingském nádraží byl náš transport /asi 1500 mužůTerezína/ rozdělen a já jsem přišel spolu s asi 500 muži do 3.lágru. První 2-3 týdny to bylo snesitelné. Jídla sice nebylo mnoho, ale měli jsme ještě určitý tělesný fond, a proto jsme příliš nehladověli. S rostoucí zimou se však také stále zmenšoval příděl potravin a v listopadu zemřel první náš kamarád Meir Lindenbaum. Pak se již řetěz nemocí, bídy a úmrtí nepřetrhl. Tábor čítal asi 1800 mužů, většinou maďarských Židů, a kdo neuměl maďarsky, byl skoro ztracen. Bydlili jsme v t. zv. Erdbunker – dlouhé, podzemní baráky s jedním oknem, dvě řady prken na spaní, uprostřed komín a kamínka. Každý vězeň měl deku, misku a lžíci. Pracoval jsem v t. zv. Holzmannkomanduvýkop v lese. Po několika týdnech práce měla většina kamarádů nohy pokryté boláky a omrzlé, takže se stěží dotáhli na pracoviště. Byla to stavba obrovské muniční továrny, vlastně celého města, skrytého v lese. Les byl asi 2 km vzdálen od našeho tábora. V prvních měsících jsi musel pracovat, i když jsi měl otevřené, hnisavé rány a vysokou horečku. Každého dne se přinášely z komand mrtvoly kamarádů, kteří zemřelipráci. Později se situace nemocných trochu zlepšila, za to však se o mnoho zhoršila situace stravovací. Na začátku jsme fasovali asi 37 dkg chleba denně, k tomu Zulagy /2 dkg margarinu, nebo plátek salámu, kousek sýra, špetku másla, lžíci marmelády nebo umělého medu/ a litr vodové polévky večer. Mimo to dostávali pracující asi 20 dkg chlebamargarinem a teplou vodu /polévku/ v poledne na pracovišti. Ke konci odpadly přídavky pro pracující a příděl chleba kolísal mezi 15-25 dkg denně. Denní program vyhlížel asi takto: ¾ 5 budíček, ½ 6 apel, 7 odchod do práce, 6 návrat z komanda, apel, fronta před kuchyní. O 9 hod. se v bunkrech zhasínalo. To byly ovšem program a strava obyčejného häftlinga. Blokový, lékařský a ostatní táborový personál měl velké výhody jak v jídle, tak v práci, ubytování a oblečení. Lägerältester, jeho zástupce a vrchní kápové byli árijci, bydleli zvlášť a dávali si zvlášť vařit. Jako všude byl i zde velký strach před infekčními nemocemi

insert_drive_file
Text from page2
a hlavně před skvrnitým tyfem, Těžce nemocní byli transportováni do Krankenlágru. Každý z nás věděl, že naděje, vrátiti se odtamtud, je mizivá. Většina nemocných dodávalo komandu Moll, kde byly pracovní podmínky nesnesitelné. Po cestě trvající 1 ½ se pracovalo 12 hodin s půlhodinovou přestávkou a znovu 1 ½ hodiny domů. Práce byla těžká /nošení cementových pytlů, betonování apod./ a jediná strava při ní byla miska studeného čaje z trávy. Nejsilnější tam nevydrželi déle, než 3 týdny. Přišlo tam o život mnoho našich nejlepších lidí, hlavně z 1. lágru. Celkem se z 1500 mužů, kteří přijeli do kauferingských táborů vrátilo /dle mého odhadu/ 40-50. 8. března odcházel z 3. lágru transport do Türkheimu 5. lágr 1Note 1: Kaufering - Lager V was Utting, Lager VI was Türkheim. Byl jsem též do něj začleněn a byl jsem tomu rád, neboť jsem si říkal, že to nikde nemůže být horší, než v Kauferingu. První dny jsem toho litoval, neboť jsme strašně hladověli, pak se však poměry zlepšily a v posledních týdnech jsme měli skoro každý den brambory na loupačku – nejideálnější táborové jídlo, neboť mimo to, že lépe sytilo, než polévka, obsahovalo jako vedlejší produkt bramborové slupky, kterých se po případě s trochou štěstí a drzosti dalo nasbírati u kapitalistů, někdy celé miska. První tři týdny v Türkheimu jsem pracoval – byli jsme na rozdíl od ostatních lágrů hlídání jen todťáky, a když jsme měli štěstí, byli to Češi, jichž tam bylo poměrně mnoho. Pak jsem však už byl tak zesláblý a vyčerpán, že mne lékař uznal marod, a dal mne do krankenbloku. Koncem března vypukl v táboře skvrnitý tyf. Počet nemocných rostl den ze dne šílenou rychlostí a nakonec lékaři již ani neprohlíželi a jednoduše každého, kdo měl přes 38 horečky, strčili do tyfového baráku. Já měl tenkrát silný průjem, a jelikož jsem měl též horečku, musel jsem též k tyfusákům. Nepomohly žádné protesty a žádný křik. Pak jsem se už ovšem tyfu neubránil, boj proti legiím vší byl naprosto beznadějný a předem prohraný. Ležel jsem 10 dní ve vysoké horečce a začal jsem se zotavovati právě, když přišel rozkaz k evakuaci tábora. Kdo byl schopen chůze, vydal se na cestu pěšky, my nemocní jsme byli dopraveni auty do Landsbergu /1. lágr/. Tam jsem prožil dva hrozné dny v nepopsatelné špíně a skoro bez jídla /v tu dobu jsem vážil asi 45 kg při výšce 187 cm/. Konečně se i ten tábor evakuoval, a ačkoli jsem se sotva na nohou držel, došel, či spíše dolezl jsem k nádraží u Holzmanna, vzdáleného asi 3 kilometry. Tam jsme byli naloženi do dobytčáků a já jsem si s posledním vypětím energie vybojoval místo v krytém vagoně, neboť jsem se obával deště a náletů. Tyto obavy byly naprosto oprávněny. Jeli jsme vzdálenost 30 km z Landsbergu do Dachau dva dny a dvě noci, poslední den a noc za neustálého, prudkého deště. Zažili jsme též několik těžkých náletůameričtí letci nás zřejmě považovali za vojenský transport. Mnoho jich cestou uteklo, já jsem však byl příliš slabý a z vagonu jsem se nehnul ani za nejprudší palby. Vyjelo nás z Landsbergu asi 3000 a do Dachau nás dojelo asi 1000 živých. Cestou uteklo asi 200. Číslo jsou ovšem nepřesná a můj vlastní odhad. V Dachau jsme
insert_drive_file
Text from page3
ještě v noci /28. dubna/ prodělali desinfekci a pak jsem spal 15 hodin jako zabitý. Spal, ačkoliv celou noc neustávalo ostřelování města a ačkoliv se dopoledne příštího dne boj přenesl dokonce do tábora. To se jej zúčastnili činně již i vězňové a odpoledne zavlál nad hlavní strážní věží prapor USA. Naši osvoboditelé nepřišli příliš brzo, neboť, jak jsme se později dozvěděli, nařídil Himmler ve zvláštním rozkaze postříleti všechny dachovské vězně večer 29. dubna.

Alex. Schmiedt

Podpisy svědků:

Marta Kratková

Robert Weinberger

Dokumentační akce: Zeev Scheck

21. VIII. 1945

Za archiv: Alex Schmiedt

References

  • Updated 2 years ago
The Czech lands (Bohemia, Moravia and Czech Silesia) were part of the Habsburg monarchy until the First World War, and of the Czechoslovak Republic between 1918 and 1938. Following the Munich Agreement in September 1938, the territories along the German and Austrian frontier were annexed by Germany (and a small part of Silesia by Poland). Most of these areas were reorganized as the Reichsgau Sudetenland, while areas in the West and South were attached to neighboring German Gaue. After these terr...
This collection originated as a documentation of the persecution and genocide of Jews in the Czech lands excluding the archival materials relating to the history of the Terezín ghetto, which forms a separate collection. The content of the collection comprises originals, copies and transcripts of official documents and personal estates, as well as prints, newspaper clippings, maps, memoirs and a small amount of non-written material. The Documents of Persecution collection is a source of informati...