Karel Abeles, on escape from Teplice, imprisonment in Łódź, Auschwitz and Gusen

Metadata

Testimony of Karel Abeles (later name Brožík), which became a part of the “documentation campaign” in Prague. Abeles describes being forced to leave his hometown Teplice in the Czechoslovak borderland in the fall of 1938. His family moved to Prague, from where they were deported to the Łódź ghetto. Abeles describes the harsh living condition in the ghetto, due to which his parents and brother died. In 1944, he was deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau and later to Gusen, where he was liberated.

zoom_in
2

Document Text

  1. English
  2. Czech
insert_drive_file
Text from page 1

Statement

Written with Karel Abeles, born 4. 2. 1926, former prisoner of the concentration camps Lodz, Auschwitz, and Mauthausen, currently residing in Prague XIII., Ruská 934, Jewish nationality, profession student.

I was born in Tepl.Šanov, where I lived with my father, mother, and older brother until the Sudetenland was annexed. From October 1938 until October 1941 we lived in Prague. That month, Jews were required to register and the first transports to Poland took place. Our entire family left on the third transport to Lodz. It happened like this: we received a summons from the Jewish Community to come to the Trade Fair Palace in  Prague on October 23rd, 1941, with a luggage limit of 50 kilograms per person. Our carrier brought our luggage, which was labelled with our number. After all of the formalities had been dealt with (handing over the keys to our apartment, and all of our gold, silver, etc.), our citizenship cards were stamped with Evakuiert 26. 10. 1941. We marched past SS Grupenführer Fidler, who took away all of our musical instruments and any luggage that looked fancy. At 6 o’clock in the morning, we boarded a passenger train that departed from the  Bubeneč train station at 1 o’clock in the afternoon. It traveled along a strange route through Dresden, Görlitz, Liegnitz, Vratislav, Lodz. Schupo accompanied us on this journey. The train ride lasted 32 hours, and we were given water only once. We got out on some sort of provisional platform. We later learned that this was Lodz. The Jewish police was waiting for us on the ramp, and it split us into groups and took us to an empty school building. There, 136 people were stuffed into a room measuring 6x6 meters. Our living conditions improved, and thereafter 78 people would stay in this room. We slept on the floor. I soon became sick with angina. Right after I got better, my mother came down with pneumonia. Because the hospitals were too full, she had to lie on the floor while she was sick. The rainy autumn weather, the abnormal accommodations, and the overcrowded living conditions produced a lot filth and made many people sick. After three weeks, we were all lice-infested and there was practically nothing we could do to prevent it.

We ate the last of the food we brought with us and then went hungry. We received 20 decagrams of bread and one soup per day. The Polish Jews didn’t help us, not a bit. We didn’t get the fuel for heating that we were allotted and received less and worse kinds of potatoes and vegetables than they did. We were forced to work hard at night during the winter, and as a consequence my father became ill with phlegmon and died of exhaustion on 5. 3. 1942. I worked as a blacksmith and my brother as a leatherworker. At the beginning of 1942, there were mass deportations from the ghetto, which emptied many apartments, and the collectives were gradually shut down. In June 1942, we were given an apartment. I contracted a bad case of hepatitis and I became severely weak. When I got better, I was assigned easier work in a factory that manufactured wooden products. In August 1942, 25,000 Jews from the ghetto were sent to the gas chambers. My mother was also supposed to be transported, but I bribed the Jewish police, and so I managed to free my mother. But her mental and physical condition was very poor at the time, and she died on 12. 10. 1942. My brother, who at the same time was tied to a bed with serious tuberculosis, died after having suffered greatly on 19. 11. 1942. I buried the 3 closest and dearest people to me according to the Jewish funeral custom.

This was a very difficult time for me. After an 11 hour work shift, I had to wash my own laundry, cook my own meals, and, worse, do my own shopping. I sold everything that I had, I earned my living, and that’s how I supported myself. In the autumn of 1943 we were given permission to send parcels to the ghetto. I received a parcel from my friend Heinz Prossnitz from Prague every week, which elevated my spirits as well as made me feel good physically. The liquidation of the ghetto began in May 1944, since the front was advancing. But we didn’t know that the line of attack stopped at Warsaw. Because we believed that the Red Army would arrive soon, we ignored the order to leave the ghetto and hid. Neither machine guns, nor

insert_drive_file
Text from page 2
any other harsh measures against us couldn’t force us to leave the ghetto. We were terribly hungry and this forced us to report ourselves for transport. On June 22nd, 1944, we left Lodz in a cattle car, destination unknown. The next morning, we arrived at a place where the first thing we saw were giant chimneys with tall flames shooting up from them. We were greeted by prisoners in prison garb and when I asked them what is being produced in the factories, they replied with ironic smiles: chocolate. I didn’t believe that, but I had no idea that hundreds of thousands of our fathers, mothers, and children were being burnt in them. We were in Birkenau near Auschwitz. After the selection process, we were sent to work as expert mechanics and dismantled airplanes that had been shot down. Camp life, as has often been described, set in. I witnessed terrible things. Hungarian, Slovak, and Theresienstadt transports arrived. This lasted until January 1945.

The Russians once again attacked near Krakow and threatened Upper Silesia. We were evacuated on January 18th. The train connection didn’t exist any longer and so we set out in wooden shoes with blankets and one loaf of bread for the journey. We walked all night and day and our strength disappeared. The only thing we had left was our will and the hope of being liberated soon. Hundreds of dead bodies of those who marched before us and had already died lay at the edge of the roads. Finally, on the fourth day, we boarded a train somewhere near Katowice. They squeezed 120 of us into one open car and, without giving us anything to eat, we rode for 4 days and 4 nights. We were numb, like animals. In Mor. Ostrava and Přerov, the inhabitants gave us some food. The SS shot at them, but this didn’t stop them and they helped us however they could. On 27. 1. 1945, our death transport ended in Mauthausen near Linz. Without getting anything to eat, they sent us off to the hot showers and then they made us run naked and wet into an ice storm. We waited for hours until they let us into the block. There were 1,200 people in the building. I didn’t sleep for 4 weeks. The Czechs there stuck together and helped us get food whenever possible. In February 1945, I was transported to Gusen. This was the worst I have ever suffered. We worked in the underground Messerschmitt airplane factory under terrible conditions: not enough food, little sleep, dirt, back-breaking and long labor, bad air, beatings, and cold. I don’t need to go into the details, just the fact that in 3 months the camp had to take up a whole new workforce because the previous one died a natural death is enough. This means that in each block, which had 800 people, an average of 10 prisoners died every day. When I was at my worst, when my strength was starting to leave me, we were liberated: on May 5th the Americans disarmed our guards and all of the prisoners left the camp. I found shelter in the Czech civilian labor camp in Linz, where I quickly recovered.

On May 18th, 1945, I returned to Prague. None of my relatives returned. I am the only living member from the part of my family that remained in Europe.

In Prague, on 16. VIII. 1945 Karel Abeles

Statement was accepted by:

Marta Kratková

Zeev Scheck

Signatures of witnesses

Robert Weinberger

Alice Ehrmannová

On behalf of the archive: Alex. Schmiedt

18. 8. 1945

insert_drive_file
Text from page 1

Protokol

sepsaný s Karlem Abelesem, nar. 4. 2. 1926, bývalým vězněm koncentračních táborů Lodž, Osvětim a Mauthausen, t. č. bytem v Praze XIII., Ruská 934, národnosti židovské, povoláním student.

Narodil jsem se v Tepl.Šanově a byl jsem tam s tatínkem, maminkou a starším bratrem do odstoupení Sudet. Od října 1938 do října 1941 bydleli jsme v Praze. V tomto měsíci začaly registrace Židů a první transporty do Polska. Třetím transportem byla naše celá rodina odvlečena do Lodže. To se stalo následujícím způsobem: Dostali jsme od Židovské náboženské obce vyzvání dostavit se 23. října 1941 do veletržního PalácePraze se zavazadlem po 50 kilech na osobu. Zavazadla opatřená naším číslem odvezl špeditér. Po vyřízení formalit, odevzdání bytových klíčů, zlata, stříbra, atd. byly naše občanské legitimace opatřeny razítkem Evakuiert 26. 10. 1941. Defilovali jsme před SS Grupenführerem Fidlerem, který nám odebral všechny hudební nástroje a luxusně vyhlížející zavazadla. V 6 hodin ráno jsme nastupovali do osobního vlaku, který odjel z bubenečského nádraží o 13. hod. Jeli jsme divnou tratí, a sice přes Drážďany, Görlitz, Liegnitz, Vratislav, Lodž. Cestou nás doprovázelo Schupo. Cesta trvala 32 hodin, a jen jednou byla nám podána voda. Vystoupili jsme na nějakém provisorním nádraží, jak nám později bylo oznámeno, byla to Lodž. Na rampě nás očekávala židovská policie, která nás seskupila a odvezla do prázdné školní budovy. Tam nás bylo do jedné místnosti o rozměru 6 x 6 metrů nacpáno 136 osob. Po postupném zlepšení bytových poměrů zůstalo nás v téže místnosti ještě vždy 78 osob. Spali jsme na zemi. Onemocněl jsem brzo těžkou anginou a sotva, že jsem se uzdravil, onemocněla moje maminka na zápal plic. Protože nemocnice byly příliš přeplněné, musela po dobu nemociležeti na zemi. Deštivé podzimní počasí, abnormálně špatné ubytovací poměry, jakož i s tím spojená veliká bytová frekvence, způsobily značnou nečistotu a onemocnění. Po třech nedělích byli jsme všichni zavšivenía nebylo téměř žádných protiopatření.

Snědli jsme své poslední přivezené zásoby a nastal veliký hlad. Dostávali jsme 20 deka chleba a jednu polívku denně. Polští Židé nepřicházeli nám vůbec vstříc, ba naopak, nedostávali jsme topivo, které nám náleželo a dostávali jsme méně a horší druhy bramborů a zeleniny nežli oni. Byli jsme nuceni jíti v noci v zimě na těžké práce, následkem čehož můj otec onemocněl flegmonou a zemřel vysílením již dne 5. 3. 1942. Pracoval jsem jako kovář a můj bratr jako brašnář. Začátkem r. 1942 bylo veliké vysídlení z ghetta, následkem čehož se uvolnilo hodně bytů a kolektivy byly postupně rozpuštěny. V červnu 1942 dostali jsme byt. Onemocněl jsem těžkou žloutenkou a zeslábl jsem silně. Byla mi pak po uzdravení přidělena lehčí práce v továrně na výrobu dřevěného zboží. V srpnu 1942 bylo 25.000 Židů z ghetta posláno do plynových komor. I moje matka již byla určena na transport, ale tím, že jsem podplatil židovský orgán policie, podařilo se mi, maminku uvolnit. Její duševní a tělesný stav byl již v této době natolik špatný, že zemřela pak 12. 10. 1942. Můj bratr, který již tehdy byl připoután k lůžku pro těžkou tuberkulosu, zemřel po těžkém trápení pak 19. 11. 1942. Pochoval jsem svoje 3 nejbližší a nejdražší podle židovského ritu.

Nastaly pro mne těžké doby. Musel jsem po 11 hodinové těžké práci sám si prát, vařit a co bylo to nejhorší, nakupovat. Prodával jsem vše, co jsem měl, přikupoval jsem si živobytí a tím jsem se vlastně udržoval. Na podzim 1943 bylo povoleno poslati do ghetta balíčky. Dostával jsem od svého přítele Heinze ProssnitzePrahy každý týden balíček, což mne tělesně, ale i duševně povzneslo. V květnu 1944 začala likvidace ghetta, jelikož se blížila fronta. Nevěděli jsme, že útok se zastavil u Varšavy. Protože jsme věřili v brzký příchod Rudé armády, neuposlechli jsme výzvě opustiti ghetto a ukrývali jsme se. Ani kulomety, ani

insert_drive_file
Text from page 2
jiná ostrá opatření proti nám nemohly nás donutit opustiti ghetto. Nastal však strašný hlad a byli jsme tím nuceni, hlásiti se do transportu. Dne 22. června 1944 odjeli jsme z Lodžedobytčáku, neznámo kam. Přistáli jsme příští ráno na místě, kde jsme jako první spatřili veliké komíny, z nichž šlehaly vysoké plameny. Byli jsme uvítání vězni ve vězeňských úborech a když jsem se je ptal, co se v těchto továrnách vyrábí, odpověděli ironickým úsměvem: Čokoláda. Tomu jsem sice nevěřil, ale netušil jsem, že je tam spáleno statisíce našich otců, matek a dětí. Byli jsme v Birkenau u Osvětíma. Po selekci byli jsme zařazeni jako odborníci mechanici na demontáž sestřelených letadel. Nastal pak lágrový život, jak již byl tak často popisován. Viděl jsem hrozné věci. Přišly maďarské, slovenské a terezínské transporty. To trvalo do ledna 1945.

Rusové opět útočili u Krakova a ohrožovali silně Horní Slezsko. Byli jsme evakuováni 18. ledna. Vlakové spojení tehdy již neexistovalo a tak jsme se vydali v dřevákách s dvěma dekami a jedním bochníkem chleba na cestu. Pochodovali jsme celou noc a den a opustily nás síly. Držela nás vůle a naděje v brzké vysvobození. Po okraji cesty ležely stovky mrtvol těch, kteří pochodovali před námi a již zahynuli. Konečně čtvrtý den jsme někde u Katovic nastoupili do vlaku. Namačkali nás 120 o jednoho otevřeného vagonu a aniž bychom byli dostali něco k jídlu, jeli jsme 4 dni a 4 noci a byli jsme otupělí jak zvířata. V Mor. Ostravě a v Přerově podávalo nám obyvatelstvo nějaké jídlo. SS do něj střílelo, ale přece pomáhali, kde mohli. Dne 27. 1. 1945 skončil náš transport smrtiMauthausenu u Linze. Aniž bychom byli dostali nějaké jídlo, musili jsme ihned pod horkou sprchu a poté nás vyháněli v nahém a mokrém stavu do ledové vichřice. Hodiny jsme čekali, než nás pustili do bloku. 1.200 osob do jednoho baráku. 4 neděle jsem nespal. Češi tam byli velice solidární a vypomáhali jídlem, kde bylo jen možné. V únoru 1945 byl jsem odtransportován do Gusenu. Tam jsem zažil vrchol všeho. Pracovali jsme v letecké továrně Messerschmitt, pod zemí, za hrozných životních podmínek: málo jídla, málo spánku, špína, těžká a dlouho trvající práce, ve špatném vzduchu, bití a zima. Není třeba uvést detaily. Stačí snad skutečnost, že během 3 měsíců tábor musel být znovu naplněn novými pracovními silami, jelikož osazenstvo zemřelo přirozenou smrtí. Znamená to, že v každém bloku o 800 lidech zahynulo denně průměrně 10 vězňů. V době nejhorší, kdy i mne začaly opustily síly, nastalo naše osvobození: 5. května Američané odzbrojili naši stráž a vězňové opustili hromadně tábor. Našel jsem úkryt v českém civilním pracovním tábořeLinci, kde jsem se rychle zotavil.

Dne 18. května 1945 vrátil jsem se do Prahy. Z mého vzdálenějšího příbuzenstva se nikdo nevrátil. Jsem jediný žijící v naší rodině, jejíž členové zůstali v Evropě.

Praha, 16. VIII. 1945 Karel Abeles

Protokol přijala:

Marta Kratková

Zeev Scheck Podpisy svědků

Robert Weinberger

Alice Ehrmannová

Za archiv:Alex. Schmiedt

18. 8. 1945

References

  • Updated 7 months ago
The Czech lands (Bohemia, Moravia and Czech Silesia) were part of the Habsburg monarchy until the First World War, and of the Czechoslovak Republic between 1918 and 1938. Following the Munich Agreement in September 1938, the territories along the German and Austrian frontier were annexed by Germany (and a small part of Silesia by Poland). Most of these areas were reorganized as the Reichsgau Sudetenland, while areas in the West and South were attached to neighboring German Gaue. After these terr...
This collection originated as a documentation of the persecution and genocide of Jews in the Czech lands excluding the archival materials relating to the history of the Terezín ghetto, which forms a separate collection. The content of the collection comprises originals, copies and transcripts of official documents and personal estates, as well as prints, newspaper clippings, maps, memoirs and a small amount of non-written material. The Documents of Persecution collection is a source of informati...